The Daily Item, Sunbury, PA

April 2, 2014

Rules of the road


For The Daily Item

— The dictionary defines roads as follows: “a long, narrow stretch with smoothed or paved surface, made for traveling by motor vehicle, carriage, between two or more points; street or highway.” Now you can interpret that to mean that anything and anybody can navigate the roads. I was wrong in saying “my roads” in a previous letter (March 19) which was simply a euphemism, a figure of speech.

Like everything else, the method of movement has evolved and automobiles, motorcycles, motorhomes, and any other motorized device are here to stay until replaced by something else. It does not appear we will be going back. Perhaps levitation will be the next method of movement or maybe in a transporter. Who knows — but the fact remains that motorized vehicles are here to stay.

Like it or not, those who drive motorized vehicles do pay more for the maintenance and upkeep of the highways through taxes at the gas pump, registration fees and driver’s licenses. Society wants motorized vehicles and they want the surfaces they have grown accustomed to using to be safe and as hazardous free as possible.

You say we should abide by the law. Yes, drivers of motorized vehicles break the law all the time. They speed, they tailgate, and they weave in and out of traffic. Yep, they do all those things and more, so would it not make sense to stay out of their way? Everyone breaks the law, including the bicyclists, walkers and joggers. I have yet to see a bicyclist stop for stop signs or traffic light — why? Bicyclists don’t stop for school buses when the bus is stopped and the stop sign is deployed. I know because I drive a school bus. Do traffic safety and traffic laws only apply to motorized vehicles?

Common sense should tell you that mixing motorized vehicles with pedestrians, bicyclists and joggers is a dangerous and unsafe combination. I for one always stop to allow pedestrians cross the roadway at intersections or crosswalks. Bicyclists don’t and neither do many motorists. Who should prevail is up to society. Not for you decide or for me to decide alone.

I, for one, do not have any desire to pedal a bicycle in the middle of winter. I am old and can’t handle the pedaling. I happen to like the comfort of my motorized vehicle where it’s nice and warm in the winter and cool in the summer. I don’t have to pedal my motorcycle and I don’t ride it in the winter time. Thank you for your responses to my last letter. I did not mean to offend anyone. At least I know someone read the letter. 

Clair Moyer, Lewisburg