The Daily Item, Sunbury, PA

October 14, 2013

Riders, steeds don disguises for Susquehanna Valley Corral’s final event of year

By Karen Blackledge
The Danville News

— COOPER TWP. — Halloween is for horses, ponies and miniature horses disguised as a bubble bath, a giant poodle, a ninja turtle, a soldier and a Holstein.

Tweakers, a Welsh pony, dressed as a poodle while her rider, Taylor Hayes, 10, of Mifflinville, wore a poodle skirt.

They and about 65 others competed in the Halloween fun show Saturday at Susquehanna Valley Corral.

Crackers, a 5-year-old pony, didn’t seem to mind being dressed as a bubble bath, complete with balloons for bubbles, a flowered shower cap, tub toys and faucet knobs. Her rider, Austyn McConnell, 3, of Danville, also wore a shower cap and a pink bathrobe.

They competed in what is known as the lead line class with Austyn’s dad, Dave McConnell, leading the pony. The McConnells and Crackers won first in their category.  

Last year Crackers and Austyn dressed as poodles, said Austyn’s aunt, Stephani Davis, of Catawissa.

Austyn’s mother, Tammy Rhodes, was in charge of the show — the last show of the year for the corral, where kids as young as 1 through adult competed for ribbons in various age classes.

Twenty-seven-year-old Appaloosa Pappy became a Holstein cow with craft paint that’s easy to wash off, said Tina Bulla, of Nescopeck. Her son, Dustin Rhodes, 9, of Nescopeck, rode Pappy.

They fashioned udders on the horse by stuffing leotards. Pappy sported a green “Got Milk” sign and a cow bell.

“He loves to be messed with. He loves attention,” Bulla said of the horse.

King, an 18-year-old quarter horse, was camouflaged and his rider, Anthony Allegrati, 11, of Berwick, dressed as a soldier.

Anthony’s aunt, Alicia Allegrati, of Orangeville, and her horse, Daisy, were all green, portraying Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. She painted a green mask on the 12-year-old horse wearing a green blanket.

Other horses and ponies were decked out in themes ranging from a Native American, to a princess to a bride.

Rhodes said other competitions were held involving riders and their horses and ponies racing around two cones, racing around a barrel, weaving in and out of poles and barnyard, or tombstone jumping, doing two jumps, turning around and running back.

People came from as far away as north of Williamsport to Ringtown to enter.