The Daily Item, Sunbury, PA

Health and Fitness

January 31, 2013

From pets to 'recess': High school stress relief

(Continued)

More than ever, a college degree is seen as a must. So more students are taking college courses in high school, and even more are enrolling in rigorous “advanced placement,” or AP classes to try to earn college credit. Add year-round sports and after-school jobs and volunteering, as a way to bolster the college application, and many students say they have little time for anything else.

“There’s just too much,” says Lexi Botts, a senior at Prospect High who sought comfort from Junie and, ultimately, school counselors after her grandfather’s death last fall.

The intensity of school has become so great, says one mom in Paoli, Pa., that she and her family have dubbed the senior year of high school “the crying year.”

“When does a child get to be a child anymore?” said Carol Meerschaert. “I fear how they will burn out when the pressure has been on them since elementary school.”

Abbie Kaplan, a junior at the Boston Latin School — a public high school that requires students to take an exam for entry — knows what she means.

On a scale of 1 to 10, she places her stress level at a pretty steady 9. She regularly has four hours of homework a night, some done before swim practice. She eats dinner around 9:30 p.m., then finishes the rest of her homework and generally goes to bed at 11:30. Then she’s up at 6 a.m. so she can be at school by 7:45.

She calls her hectic schedule “the new normal.”

“You keep telling yourself that it will prepare you for the future,” Kaplan says. “It’s just sort of how it is.”

She, too, has had anxiety attacks related to her workload, she says. And some parents say school shootings, including the recent massacre in Newtown, Conn., only worsen the stress.

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