The Daily Item, Sunbury, PA

January 6, 2014

Samsung unveils 105-inch curved-screen TV

By Hayley Tsukayama
The Washington Post

LAS VEGAS — LAS VEGAS — Samsung unveiled some forward-thinking engineering on Monday with a whole new lineup of curved-screen TVs that it says will change the way we look at our television.

The jaw-dropping product of the new lineup is the firm’s 105-inch curved-screen TV, the firm said Monday. In a press preview Sunday night, Samsung’s executive vice president of visual displays, H.S. Kim, had said that the massive television’s curve gives everyone watching the display the “best seat in the house.”

Kim said that they are working with content producers in Hollywood and elsewhere to make sure that there’s enough high-quality content for its ultra high-definition screens, which he boasted provide four times the display quality of a normal television and true color accuracy.

Samsung’s Joe Stinziano, senior sales vice president for the firm’s consumer electronics division, noted that the whole curved television range — Samsung also has 73-inch, 65-inch and 55-inch models — have smart capabilities that allow viewers to use the Web while watching television. For example, Stinziano said, users will be able to watch a sports game, while also looking up stats and the weather at the venue using apps that run on the television.

Stinziano said that users will be able to upgrade their televisions through software updates, lest they worry that they’ve made a hefty investment in a television that becomes obsolete in two years.

The company showed off a little wizardry from their research and development department at the press event Sunday, pulling out a bendable television that can change its curve on demand, depending on what users are watching. Samsung executives were quick to note that the bendable television is just a prototype — a preview of what the firm is capable of making — rather than a product that it’s going to put on the market in the next few years.

Still, the television made a big splash, and the firm let journalists and analysts use the remote control to bend the flexible screen from flat to curved and back again to get an idea of how it works.