The Daily Item, Sunbury, PA

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November 16, 2013

HealthCare.gov lead developer's hires bungled other jobs

By Jerry Markon and Alice Crites

The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — The lead contractor on the dysfunctional website for the Affordable Care Act is filled with executives from a company that mishandled at least 20 other government IT projects, including a flawed effort to automate retirement benefits for millions of federal workers, documents and interviews show.

CGI Federal, the main website developer, entered the U.S. government market a decade ago when its parent company purchased American Management Systems, a Northern Virginia contractor that was coming off a series of troubled projects. CGI moved into AMS' custom-made building off Interstate 66 in Fairfax County, changed the sign outside and kept the core of employees, who now populate the upper ranks of CGI Federal.

They include CGI Federal's current and past presidents, the company's chief technology officer, its vice president for federal health care and its health IT leader, according to company and other records. More than 100 former AMS employees are now senior executives or consultants working for CGI in the Washington area.

A top CGI official said this week that the company is "extremely proud" of its acquisition of AMS. Lorne Gorber, CGI's senior vice president for global communications, said CGI had been aware of the AMS "trip-ups" but has transformed the AMS culture over the past decade. "Anyone at CGI who came from AMS would not be able to find any similarities in how they work today to how they worked a decade ago,'' Gorber said.

He said that CGI's overall government contracting work remains high quality and that the company "delivers 95 percent of its projects on time and on budget.''

A year before CGI Group acquired AMS in 2004, AMS settled a lawsuit brought by the head of the Federal Retirement Thrift Investment Board, which had hired the company to upgrade the agency's computer system. AMS had gone $60 million over budget and virtually all of the computer code it wrote turned out to be useless, according to a report by a U.S. Senate committee.

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