The Daily Item, Sunbury, PA

Sandy Hook

December 15, 2012

Column: 12 facts about guns and mass shootings in the U.S.

(Continued)

www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/special/nation/deadliest-us-shootings

5. America is an unusually violent country. But we're not as violent as we used to be.

Kieran Healy, a sociologist at Duke University, in July made a graph of "deaths due to assault" in the United States and other developed countries. The United States is a clear outlier, with rates well above other countries.

As Healy writes, "The most striking features of the data are (1) how much more violent the U.S. is than other OECD countries (except possibly Estonia and Mexico, not shown here), and (2) the degree of change_and recently, decline_there has been in the U.S. time series considered by itself."

www.kieranhealy.org/blog/archives/2012/07/20/america-is-a-violent-country

6. The South is the most violent region in the United States.

In a subsequent post, Healy drilled further into the numbers and looked at deaths due to assault in different regions of the country. Just as the United States is a clear outlier in the international context, the South is a clear outlier in the national context.

www.kieranhealy.org/blog/archives/2012/07/21/assault-deaths-within-the-united-states

7. Gun ownership in the United States is declining overall.

"For all the attention given to America's culture of guns, ownership of firearms is at or near all-time lows," political scientist Patrick Egan, of New York University, wrote in July. The decline is most evident on the General Social Survey, though it also shows up on polling from Gallup.

The bottom line, Egan writes, is that "long-term trends suggest that we are in fact currently experiencing a waning culture of guns and violence in the United States."

themonkeycage.org/blog/2012/07/21/the-declining-culture-of-guns-and-violence-in-the-united-states

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