The Daily Item, Sunbury, PA

Technology

September 2, 2013

Google Glass could be peek at tech future

(Continued)

Associated Press — The screen is deliberately aligned slightly above the right eye so it won't prevent users from maintaining eye contact during face-to-face conversations. That means you need to glance upward when you want to look at something on the screen.

Glass' coolest feature is its ability to almost instantly take photos with the device's 5-megapixel camera or record high-definition (720p) videos that provide a startling perspective on how your own eyes see things. This is done simply by saying "OK Glass, take a picture" or "OK Glass, record a video" and the device does it. The images can then be seen on the display screen and, then, with the right app, shared on Twitter or Facebook and stored on your Google Plus profile.

I found myself wishing Glass had been around when my now 18-year-old daughter was a little girl so I could have had pictures and video of so many precious moments that remain in my mind's eye. Many of those moments aren't around in photographic form because they were too fleeting to capture on a handheld camera or camcorder.

It's easy to see why the built-in camera on Glass is raising privacy concerns —even though smartphones already make it easy for people to take a photo or record video at almost any time in just about any situation. Google says Glass isn't that much different. The company has tried to minimize the chances of surreptitious photos or video being taken by ensuring a red light is visible whenever an image is being recorded.

Nevertheless, Glass has already been banned from gambling casinos, movie theaters and some bars to protect against cheating, copyright infringement and privacy intrusions.

I can see how a lot of people aren't going to notice when they're on Glass' candid camera. For instance, I recorded a video of a Google representative discussing the privacy worries about Glass without him noticing. I did it by acting like I was adjusting Glass on my head, allowing me to press on a small button located on the top of Glass' right frame (this technique is an alternative to using the spoken word to command the device).

All in all, Glass looks like it's going to emerge as device that advances technology in ways bound to excite gadget lovers and information junkies while annoying plenty of others who may wish there was an app to transport them to a simpler time.

 

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