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Robert Inglis/The Daily Item Evangelical Community Hospital staff Brittany Tremblay, left, Ruth Anne Griffin, and Katrina Oberdorf, man the hospital's drive through coronavirus testing site on Thursday morning.

Some state licensing regulations are being waived to allow for retired health care professionals in Pennsylvania to help aid in the response to the coronavirus response. 

Last week, the Department of State waived some regulations for nurses, removed barriers for pharmacies to provide services, and announced that in-state and out-of-state health care practitioners can treat patients via telemedicine during the coronavirus emergency.

“Many retired and inactive health care professionals want to help bolster our health care system during this crisis,” Secretary of State Kathy Boockvar said in a statement released this morning. “This action will allow people with inactive or retired licenses in good standing to reactivate their licenses and immediately lend their assistance in this challenging time. We thank these retirees for their willingness to serve.

These new regulation suspensions increase the number of available and qualified health care practitioners in Pennsylvania by allowing retired practitioners to re-enter their field more easily without paying reactivation fees:

  • State Board of Medicine licensees who are in active/retired status for less than four years can apply for reactivation of their license. Their continuing education (CE) requirements and license reactivation fees will be suspended. This measure allows these practitioners’ licenses to become active unrestricted until Dec. 31, 2020.  If a licensee wishes to continue practicing beyond Dec. 31, 2020, the licensee will need to renew the active-unrestricted license and meet all current requirements at that time.
  • Medical Doctors (MDs) and certain allied health professionals integral to providing care during this state of emergency, whose licenses are expired/inactive for less than four years, may apply for reactivation of their licenses. Their CE requirements and license reactivation fees will be suspended.  This measure allows retired/inactive MDs, physician assistants, respiratory therapists and perfusionists to become active until December 31, 2020.
  • State Board of Osteopathic Medicine licensees who are in active/retired status for less than four years can apply for reactivation of their licenses. Their CE requirements and license reactivation feels will be suspended.  This measure allows retired/inactive Doctors of Osteopathic Medicine (DOs) to become active unrestricted until Oct. 31, 2020. If a licensee wishes to continue practicing beyond that date, the licensee would need to renew the active-unrestricted license and meet all current requirements at that time.
  • DOs and certain allied health professionals integral to providing care during this state of emergency, whose licenses are expired/inactive for less than four years, can apply for reactivation of their licenses. Their CE requirements and license reactivation fees will be suspended. This measure, which applies to retired/inactive DOs, physician assistants, respiratory therapists and perfusionists, allows those individuals to become active until October 31, 2020.  
  • Registered Nurses (RNs), Clinical Nurse Specialists (CNSs), and Certified Registered Nurse Practitioners (CRNPs) whose licenses are expired/inactive for less than five years can apply for reactivation of their licenses. Their CE requirements and license reactivation fees will be suspended.
  • Pharmacists whose licenses are expired/inactive for less than four years can apply for reactivation of their licenses. Their CE requirements and license reactivation fees will be suspended.

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